Retreats

At ZMM and ZCNYC

  • $350.00 – Program Price
  • $315.00 – *Practicing Member Price
  • $250.00 – **MRO Student Price
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A Planet of Poets Workshop

with Margaret Gibson

July 10 - 12, 2020

We are the first humans to live with the knowledge that our planet is not immortal. How can art address that? What is our responsibility as poets? In this workshop we’ll explore the place where language comes up against this undeniable new fact of life. A mix of exercises and discussion, the workshop will focus on how we can use the act of writing not only for powerful expression, but also to open ourselves to perceptions that surprise us into deeper understanding.   We will work directly with selected “objects” from the natural world, using each as a focus of interdependence and the understanding that no one thing exists by itself. I like to think that we are re-weaving the web of relations, gazing into Indra’s net, jewel by jewel.

Please don’t let financial issues prevent you from attending a program at the Monastery. If you can’t afford the program fee, there are options. 

Teacher

Margaret Gibson
Margaret Gibson is the author of 12 books of poems, most recently Not Hearing the Wood Thrush, which was published in 2018. A poem from that collection, “Passage” appears in The Best Poems of 2017. Her earlier book, Broken Cup (2014), was a finalist for the 2016 Poet’s Prize while the title poem won a Pushcart Prize for that year. In 2019 she was named Poet Laureate of the State of Connecticut. “Margaret Gibson has created a voice and an art that connect the sensuous experience of the physical world with the inner life,” —Pattiann Rogers. Nationally and internationally acclaimed, Margaret Gibson’s poetry is characterized by an uncommon diversity.  The voice may be predominantly lyrical and meditative, and yet there are award-winning, book-length narratives in which she fully inhabits the consciousness of her personae.  Hers is “a finely crafted lyricism and attention to detail rare among poets today,” wrote Brian Henry.  Gibson herself has said, “Writing poetry is an act of attention and receptivity.  You study whatever it is that strikes your attention—whether a scarlet tanager, river, field, or forest, whether mother, daughter, alcoholic, photographer, lover. You take what’s given into that part of the self that inquires, tests, embraces,…
Learn more about Margaret Gibson