John Daido Loori

From the Archives: The Dance in Your Bones

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John Daido Loori, Roshi

Zen Mountain Monastery, 9/11/2005

The True Dharma Eye, Case #55

There is a music in us, an inner voice which is audible to our teachers, but not always to us. We can’t express this music using other’s words or other’s ways of seeing things. Yet the expression of it is the vital thing; it’s not enough to embody it — we have to be able to communicate that truth. Daido Roshi encourages us to ‘let our bones dance’, to respond, and to sing with others in such a way that it creates a voice that doesn’t belong to anyone; our collective voice. That is true expression, true intimacy; that is truth; which in turn leads to true compassion that we can activate in the world.

From the Archives: The Original Source

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John Daido Loori, Roshi

Zen Mountain Monastery, 11/28/2004

Koans of the Way of Reality

Religious traditions all over the world have always had to deal with the question of “the source.” If God created the world, then who, or what created God? Is there anything outside of God, outside the universe? It is this mystery that lies at the heart of all religious searching, and it is one that cannot be described in words or images. In taking up this question, Daido Roshi quotes Master Jingqing’s answer to a monk: “One drop is just black ink. Two drops, and a dragon comes to life.”

From the Archives: Intimate Expression

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John Daido Loori, Roshi

Zen Mountain Monastery, 9/27/2003

Koans of the Way of Reality, Case #109

How do we perceive the truth? If we look for it with our eyes and our ears, we’ll miss it. In this talk, Daido Roshi takes up the intuitive nature of expression and understanding, and reminds us, once again, that it’s “all in the subtleties.”

From the Archives: Going Beyond Buddha

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John Daido Loori, Roshi

Zen Mountain Monastery, 6/26/1998

True Dharma Eye, Case #12

Zen points us toward a direct realization of our true nature that surpasses any ideas we might have. In this talk Daido Roshi looks at the path of Zen training, teaching that at every point along the way, our practice is deeply personal and includes everything.

From the Archives: Perfection Revealed

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John Daido Loori, Roshi

Zen Mountain Monastery, 10/5/1995

The Gateless Gate, Case #9

The teachings tell us we’re already perfect and complete. But why don’t we feel that way? Our sense of separation from our perfection is the root of our suffering. The aim of practice is to make this truth alive and real in our lives right now.